Borty's World

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A Clear View March 14, 2010

One of the trends for Spring 2010: lucid wear.  Designers are feeling transparent for Spring 2010; from head to toe literally.  Accessories from Patricia Von Musulin, Zac Posen and Sonia Rykiel trench coats, Fendi clutches, and Michael Kors pretty much dedicated his collection to the trend.  Kors has a pair of brogues I would kill for.   

Fendi Spring 2010

Fendi Spring 2010

 Does anyone else remember when this, then considered a “fad”, was in a few years ago?  Plastic-like shoes were everywhere; when one would sweat they would stick to your feet and they often would turn yellow.  Louis Vuitton even had those transparent hologram bags.  This time around, it seems designers have invested more time; we’ve come to the point where the contemporary and bridge lines are adapting ideas from better brands and making them… well, better.  (no pun intended)  Lucid-wear can be tricky and sometimes tacky, but these garments are far from a disaster.  We all know designers grab inspiration from what’s going on the world- could this “plastic” surge come from everyone clamoring to “Go Green”?  Who knows.  But I do know I’m not the only one asking how long this trend will last.     

Check out these other looks.   

Patricia Von Musulin Spring 2010 ring

Patricia Von Musulin 2010 bangles

Zac Posen Spring 2010

Sonia Rykiel Spring 2010

Sonia Rykiel Spring 2010

   

  

Versace Spring 2010

Versace Spring 2010

  

Versace Spring 2010

Michael Kors Spring

Michael Kors Spring

Michael Kors Spring

 

Yigal Azrouël March 9, 2010

After debuting in 1998, Isreal born-New York based designer Yigal Azrouël started showing at Fashion Week the following year.  As he should; his designs are beautiful- classic, yet modern and innovative.  His men’s Spring 2010 collection features loose threads, leather vests, and extraordinary jackets.  Gray colours and stripe-schemes hit the runway; making it easy to go from beach to street.

For Women’s Spring 2010, the garments were similar to that of the men’s in terms of design shapes and hue, but more feminine.  Where a jacket is considered baggy on a man, it drapes on a woman; trousers look like his and her’s, and some garments proved that less is more.  Swimwear were cohesive with the entire collection and perhaps the influence for some of the tops (see below).  The architectural structure of his boutique in the Meatpacking district is as intriguing as the garments.  See the entire collection at Yigal Azrouël.com